SPP Priorities

Local Strategic Priorities for Action

The findings from the Community Safety Survey and the priorities identified in the strategic assessment translate into the following themes. Between 2018 and 2023, the collaborative work of SPP partners will focus on:

1. YOUNG PEOPLE AT RISK

Partners have begun to pilot more integrated working practices across police and children and family services to deliver a new model of support for adolescents who have been identified as at particular risk of harm. Tackling child sexual and criminal exploitation, and disrupting county lines drug trafficking will be a key focus. This work builds on the Stronger Futures Programme developed by the Children’s Trust.

2. ANTI-SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

Continuing to support the coordination of both operational and longer-term responses to vulnerable people with complex needs who are often involved in long-standing cases of anti-social behaviour and cause community concern. The Health and Wellbeing Board has included this work in its strategic plan in order to underline the importance of this work, providing additional support from city leaders responsible for health and social care.

3. SUBSTANCE MISUSE

Reduce the harms from alcohol and substance misuse, support the recovery community, reduce the availability of low-cost, high-strength alcohol, use licensing powers to promote the responsible drinking, improve outcomes for people with complex needs (toxic trio – mental health, substance misuse, domestic abuse). This work is also reflected in the Health and Wellbeing Strategy.

4. VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE

Particularly domestic abuse, sexual offences and hate crime. Support services available to those suffering domestic abuse have been redesigned and restructured to improve multi-agency responses for young people and families at risk. We will also improve understanding of the impact on children, and increase work with repeat perpetrators.

5. IMPROVE ACCESSIBILITY AND CAPACITY OF MENTAL HEALH PROVISION 

The pandemic and restrictions have had a wide-reaching effects on society and while we can begin to identify some of the harm suffered, other consequences may not be known for many years. The biggest impact appears to be on mental health, and, in particular, for those who have been exposed to the most disruption and disadvantages, children and young people, and those who have existing mental health disorders. National research has highlighted that mental health services have not been able to keep up with additional demand, for both children and young people.  Working with partners from health services, we will support the national adult community mental health transformation programme (No Wrong Door) across Hampshire, Southampton, Isle of Wight, and Portsmouth.

6. INCREASE THE AWARENESS OF CYBER- RELATED HARM

The pandemic has dramatically accelerated a shift towards increasingly using online platforms for our day-to-day needs, including socialising, working from home, and shopping. We identified that this has created more opportunities for criminals to access victims. We recognise that there is a serious gap in our knowledge around cybercrime locally, with much of the data only available at a national or county level, and many people are not recognising that the behaviours they encounter are online crimes. We are beginning to collect our own data on cyber-related harm through our Community Safety Survey.